The Piper

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May 2017

In This Issue...
 Ramblings in the Redwoods
 Preschool News
 Angel in the Kitchen
 Around the World
 The Back Page... St. Andrew's Means

Ramblings in the Redwoods
Father Blaine Hammond

Having just passed through Earth Day, I think it would be a good idea to talk about the earth and how we treat it.
First, the earth has been described as a sacrament of God. That is to say, God is revealed to us and experienced by us as we contact, connect with and meditate on creation. God is distanced from us as we disregard, disre-spect or destroy creation.
We need places to live, things to eat, clean air to breathe and clean water to drink. Those are basic necessities, and they are only possible when we consider the systems of the earth as a whole; that is, how did God create them to work? How can we work with instead of against God’s order? And how can we keep from falling for the arguments given by those who want to misuse God’s creation for short-term profit, trying to steer our attention away from the good that God blessed in creating it as it is in the first place?
Throughout history, and prehistory, humans have had several differ-ent kinds of relationships with the earth. Hunter-gatherers have used it as a source for food, also those who practice agriculture. We have used it as a source for philosophy and theology, for meditation and for myth. We have seen in it echoes of our own selves, and we have seen ourselves as some-thing different from and greater than the rest of creation. We have heard the word “dominion” spoken from the scriptures and some of us have under-stood it to mean that suppression and greed are blessed by God. We have heard the word “dominion” spoken in the scriptures and others of us under-stood it to mean that we are to have the same loving care for creation that god has demonstrated. We have heard both opinions referred to as “good stewardship.”
How are we supposed to make anything useful of this? The whole range of opinions about how to understand and deal with the earth is present in Christian tradition in one group or another.
We Anglicans are taught to use reason as one of the ways we ap-proach questions of scripture and tradition. Reason is more than a cold aca-demic approach; it includes our hearts and our spirits. The Episcopal Church has given us some guidance, which is sometimes different from the guidance given by some other churches. I think our church is right in its approach, which is to discourage the easy way — which relies on poisonous compounds that interfere with the way God made the earth to work. Let me explain how my personal faith understands this, my having practiced organic gardening and care of the earth for many decades.
The need to even talk about all of this comes from three events closely related in time: the invention of artificial petroleum-based fertilizers, the invention of chemical herbicides and the invention of chemical insecti-cides. The use of artificial fertilizers combined with the developing science of hybridization, which resulted in higher-yielding crops, created what was called the “Green Revolution,” which was supposed to eliminate hunger.
Chemical insecticides were supposed to be to agriculture what antibi-otics were to medicine. But there is a problem with putting poisons into the environment: they have other effects than what we intend. DDT was discovered to be causing massive destruction of birds because it made their egg-shells too fragile. This was the basis of the groundbreaking book Silent Spring by Rachel Carson. As time went on it became clear that insecticides kill insects indiscriminately as well as killing other species, including humans, as some insecticides have been pegged as carcinogenic. Many of them stay in the environment for a long time without breaking down. One ongoing battle between growers and farm workers has been over exposure of workers to poisons without adequate protection. These same poisons appear in the grocery stores on our fruits and vegetables.
Herbicides also have an effect on more than just the plants that they are aimed at. They have been shown to have bad effects on animals, including humans, as well as on plant species that are not targeted. People living next door to someone using herbicides sometimes have to watch helplessly as their plants die. For those who have heard that herbicides are not dangerous, remember that the people telling us that are the same ones who said Agent Orange was safe. (If you haven’t heard of Agent Orange, do an online search for it.) Remember that they are poisons. We are supposed to wear masks as we apply them.
Petroleum-based fertilizers are water soluble, whereas only some natural, organic fertilizers are. This means several things. First, it means that the effect is immediate but short-term. The fertilizers dissolve and percolate through the soil, meaning another dose is necessary in fairly short order. Second, it means that the dissolved chemicals find their way into the water table. A great many problems of water pollution are the result of non-organic fertilizers finding their way into the water courses. Third, these strong chemicals kill all kinds of underground life, from microbial to invertebrate. Healthy soil could be described as a living organism. Soil that has been artificially fertilized over a period of time could be described as a dead organ-ism. Such soil loses tilth and fertility, and must be given increasing regular doses of artificial fertilizers attempting to make up for the loss of what an organic approach offers naturally.
It takes time to rebuild soil that has been fertilized to death, but fortunately it is not impossible. Soil-building materials such as peat and steer manure, along with a determination to use natural fertilizers, can restore the kind of balance that God originally put in place.
There was a test a few years ago which claimed to reveal that organic food is not more nutritious than non-organic food. This was supposed to make the organic food movement stop, I suppose. But that is not the main reason for the organic food movement. The main reason is that non-organic growing pro-cesses kill the earth and cause diseases.
Certainly there are emergency situations calling for the use of judi-ciously applied chemicals; we had to tent the Parish Hall several years back to kill a termite infestation, for instance. But in the long term, there are other approaches to dealing with harmful insects and invasive plants. Pulling them by hand, or picking them off by hand, is more time-consuming but less hazard-ous, as an example. For those who aren’t excited about that option, there are natural substances which can be utilized – it is one of the positive uses for to-bacco, for instance. Look into the literature and check the shelves at the gar-den stores.
Chemicals have their place; but to dump poisonous ones onto or into the earth and water are not, to me, a proper way to practice stew-ardship of the earth or to respect its nature as a sacrament of God. Our church is finding its way to a theology of ecology and the environment and is asking us to make a point of honoring the creation of God by not poisoning it. I would like to see us make that our practice.

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Why I Am An Episcopalian: Reason #61
Mystery and clarity coexist here.
Alex H. MacDonell, Diocese of New Jersey, from 101 Reasons to be Episcopalian

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Preschool News

A great big shout out to all who donated items to the St.
Andrew’s Preschool Rummage Sale!! I am very thankful to all of you. Your support has been beautiful and we have to just keep on pushing to get enroll-ment up.
We are planning a summer program that implements cultural arts and swimming so if you know anyone with children looking for something to do this summer, have them call me and we can set up an appointment to discuss all the details.
I would like to acknowledge Jerry Fishel for taking the time to clean up our play yard, it looks great!
May 27 at the Memorial Day event at Covered Bridge Park I will be having my last fundraiser of the year. Details coming soon. Thank you all again. God is good, and so are all of you.

- Sherry Stone, Preschool Director

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Prayer Cloths

You may have seen the little yarn squares around the church recently and wondered what they are. They were crocheted by Janet Butler and she
describes them like this.
This pocket prayer cloth is made especially for you or some-one you care about. It is meant to bring you comfort by symbolizing God's love for you and the prayers of your family and friends for your health and well-being.
Slip it in your pocket or purse, keep it by your bedside or use it any way you wish that might bring you comfort and peace.
When your fingers touch it, remember, you are never alone, for God is always with you.

“May the God of hope fill you with all joy and peace in believing, that you may abound in hope by the power of the Holy Spirit.” Romans 15:13

We Get Letters...
Dear Janet, I am writing to thank you for sharing your craft, prayers, and love with me. It arrived safely from Mary Jo Neish today.
My life is filled with stress that happens to me a few times a year prior to important religious celebrations. I have been unaware that this was what was happening until I held your square and wept. Then I remembered. I breathe with relief that I know what is wrong. You would think I would see it after so many years of going through this. The enemy tries to pull me away from my adoration of
Jesus and I miss it every time. So, here I sit in prayer and thanksgiving for the miraculous gift of love that God gives and for my understanding that all this time has been Satan’s attempt to distract me from God’s great works.
MJ and I have lived through this for 58 years. Now I have you to add to my prayers You are a blessing to many.
Love, Georgia

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Tag along Jesus or tagging along with Jesus?

This article is addressed specifically to Christians who just celebrat-ed Easter, though I believe it applies to all who have a relationship with God, especially those who profess Islam and Judaism.
I must confess that even as a priest of the church, sometimes my spiritual life devolves into one where I barely notice Jesus until a crisis brings me back to Him. I discover that I am most alive, though, when I un-derstand that I have the opportunity to tag along with Jesus instead of think-ing He is tagging along with me. It is during those times I am spending time in prayer with Jesus, not just for my needs or the needs of others, which too often dominate my prayers, but as a friend, in whose presence I am trans-formed.
Jesus calls us friends, brothers and sisters, and invites us to hang out with Him daily, weekly, monthly, annually and for all eternity. It is what we will do for all eternity, so we may as well practice it now. Hanging out with Jesus is Joy and Wonder and Wonderful. Tagging along with Jesus means wondering each day where we will travel together…Waking up each day with Jesus we have the opportunity to share a cup of coffee with Him and ask Him, as my friends and I did as teenagers, “Well Jesus, what do you want to do today?”
So, during this Easter season, we might want to ask ourselves, “With whom will we be hanging out or tagging along?” Are we tagging along with Jesus or expecting Him to tag along with us? What do you want to do today and every day?
“For now, we see through a glass darkly; but then face to face.” I Cor 13.12
Reprinted by permission of the Rev. James Shumard, priest in charge, St. Mark’s Episcopal Church, Casper, WY.

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Angel in the Kitchen
Feel'n good when cook'n and sharin' the love of God

Pocket Prayer Cloth
Sharin' the theme...

Materials Needed: ** Soft worsted weight yarn - pastel solid color ** Size F crochet hook Abbreviations: CH = chain SC = single crochet DC = double crochet PC = popcorn stitch SL ST = slip stitch YO = yarn over SK = skip a stitch
Finished size approximately 3" x 4" or smaller depending on yarn used. POPCORN STITCH - Say a 'In the name of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit”
as you make 3 DC in the same stitch. Take the hook out of the loop of the last DC and insert the hook in the top of first DC. Hook the loop you just dropped and draw it through the stitch. Pull tight and then CH 1. Push the popcorn stitch to the front as you go to the next SC. CH 10 loosely. (Pray with every stitch)
ROW 1- Starting in the second chain from the hook, SC in each chain (9 SC total). CH 1, Turn.
Row 2- SC in each stitch across (19SC total). CH 1. Turn.
Row 3- SC 4, PC 1, SC 4. CH 1. Turn.
Row 4- SC in each stitch across (9SC total). CH 1. Turn.
Row 5-6– Repeat rows 3 & 4.
Row 7- SC2, PC 1, SC 1, PC1, Sc1, PC 1, Sc 2. CH 1. Turn.
Row 8– SC in each stitch (9 SC total). CH 1. Turn.
Row 9–10- Repeat rows 3 & 4.
Row 11– SC in each stitch, CH 1, but do not turn (9SC total).
Border: 2 SC in last stitch of Row 11, then SC evenly around the prayer cloth, making 3 SC in each corner except the first corner. Once you get back to the first corner, make 1 SC in that stitch (it will al-ready have 2 SC in it). Fasten off and weave in ends.

Do you have a recipe to share? Contact Janet Butler at hermph54@gmail.com

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The Episcopal Branch of the Jesus Movement

What is the Jesus Movement? We’re following Jesus into loving, lib-erating and life-giving relationship with God, with each other and with the earth.
How do we join? First, we follow Jesus. We are simply the Episcopal branch of the Jesus Movement, seeking every day to love God with our whole heart, mind and soul, and to love our neighbors as ourselves (Matthew 22:36-40). Just like Jesus.
What’s our work? Evangelism, Reconciliation, and Creation Care.
Evangelism: Listen for Jesus' movement in our lives and in the world. Give thanks. Proclaim and celebrate it! Invite the Spirit to do the rest.
INSPIRE Episcopalians to embrace evangelism
GATHER Episcopal evangelists
EQUIP all to be evangelists
SEND all as evangelists
Reconciliation: Embody the loving, liberating, life-giving way of Jesus with each other.
TELL the truth about church and race
REWRITE the narrative
FORM Episcopalians as reconcilers
REPAIR & RESTORE institutions & society
Creation Care: Encounter and honor the face of God in creation.
DEVELOP creation care resources
GROW local eco-ministries
PURSUE eco-justice at church-wide and local levels
CONVENE conversations around climate and faith
http://www.episcopalchurch.org/page/jesus-movement

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Around the World

Around the Episcopal Church USA…
First Black Woman Diocesan Bishop Consecrated
The Rev. Jennifer Baskerville-Burrows was ordained and consecrated the eleventh bishop of Indianapolis April 29, making her the first black woman to lead a diocese in the history of the Episcopal Church and the first woman to succeed another woman as diocesan bishop. Presiding Bishop Michael Curry led the service as chief consecrator and was joined by more than 40 bishops from across the church. Nearly 1,400 participated in the service at Clowes Hall on the campus of Butler University. Diocese of Chicago Jeffrey D. Lee preached. From 2012 until her election as bishop, Baskerville-Burrows served on Lee’s staff as director of networking in the Diocese of Chicago.
Seen above in the background is the Rt. Rev. Barbara Harris, the first woman bishop in the Anglican Communion. Bishop Harris was the Suffra-gan Bishop of Massachusetts from 1989-2003. The full story at Episcopal News Service. (photo courtesy ENS)
٠٠٠Walking the Way on God’s Earth

Around the Area…
PB to Headline May 19-20 EcoJustice Weekend in SF
Friday, May 19: Day of Inspiration
Grace Cathedral, SF, 8:30 a.m. to 9 p.m.
This all-day gathering is centered around racial reconciliation, justice, food, and the environment. From sacred water to sacred wheat, the plenaries and panels will lead up to two meals: lunch inspired by recipes from award-winning Afro-Vegan Chef Bryant Terry and Eucharist with The Presiding Bishop of The Episcopal Church, the Most Rev. Michael B. Curry.
Saturday, May 20: Day of Action
Golden Gate Overlook, SF
The day begins with an Eco-Confirmation at the Golden Gate Overlook in the Presidio, officiated by Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, where confirm-ands will affirm their commitment both to the church and to the Earth. The rest of the day, everyone is invited to participate in family-friendly activi-ties and actions across the Bay Area that put EcoJustice into action.
For more details visit: diocal.org/ecojustice
Around the Worldwide Anglican Communion…
Anglicans Pray: Thy Kingdom Come
The Episcopal Church has joined the world-wide Anglican Communion in Thy Kingdom Come, a campaign initiated by Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby calling for pray-er by individuals, congregations and fami-lies. Thy Kingdom Come is a global prayer movement that invites Christians around the world to pray between Ascension Day (May 25) and Pentecost (June 4) for people to come to know Jesus. Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Michael Curry will lead the video messages on May 25.
#Pledge2Pray: Pledge2Pray kicks off on May 5; sign up to
participate here: episcopalchurch.org/thy-kingdom-come.

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May:
Cindy Garay
2
Sandi Lewandowski
2
Cathy Newfield
3
Erika Snyder
5
Preston Boomer
7
Janet Parske
8
Jaden Ruff
10
Barry Holtzclaw
12
Katie Garay
18
Tracie Snyder
21
Tim Cadell
21
Michael Freeman
22
Logan Hudson
28

June:
Corinna Stevenson
2
Mario Landeros
5
Karen Van Groningen
9
Jamie Mello
10
Sarah Townsend
11
Sandi Templeman
17
Joe Mello
18
Roxanne Spring
21
Lynn Mooney
22
Cory Marello
26
Duquan Ruff
25

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The Back Page... by Paula Jansen

St. Andrew's Means...

St. Andrew’s means community to me
and love
and friends
and God
and worship
and Jesus.
I came to St. Andrew’s looking for a church
and got all of the above - who knew so much could
come from a church? A little, tiny, historic church in a
neighborhood in Ben Lomond?
St. Andrew’s pulls me in when I feel like slipping away.
That's a very good thing.
St. Andrew’s is there for me when all I want to do is
cry. Who could ask for more?
St. Andrew’s had given me the opportunity to rise to
challenges I never thought I'd be ready for.
St. Andrew’s is a gem in the heart of Ben Lomond.
Let’s figure out how to share ourselves with more
people because we have so much to give.

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What do you think? Letters to the Editor are welcome! If you are interested in submitting an article in next month's newsletter, contact Elizabeth Forbes or Paula Jansen.